Styling Table Fields

The Style command in the context menu on column headers allows us to set the display style for a field.   We can change the display style for a field by right-clicking the column head for the field and choosing Style.  That launches the Style dialog, allowing us to choose different ways of displaying text as URLs, different ways of displaying dates and times, or different styles for latitude and longitude numbers, such as decimal degrees or degrees, minutes, and decimal seconds, all with automatic adaptation to different language and country styles for displaying numeric values and dates.   

 

Choosing a style can provide useful information at a glance, such as the styles for Tile fields in images which provide at a glance the size of tiles and the number and data type of channels used.  Styles for geometry fields in drawings can at a glance show the size of the geom, either in bytes or the number of coordinates.

 

When fields are styled in a table, other components such as the Values tab in the Info pane, or  Labels,  that take their data from those fields will automatically inherit the style specified for that field in the table.

 

 Styling a field does not change either the field's data type or the contents of that field.  It just changes the way the contents of the field are displayed in a table window, the Info pane, Labels, or other settings where the table values are displayed.    For example, styling a datetime field that contains the value 05/19/2016 07:27:37 to use the D (date) option so it displays as Thursday, 19 May 2016  does not convert the datetime field into a text field so that the day of the week and the month can be spelled out, nor does it truncate the datetime value to remove the time portion.   It simply shows the datetime value using a different display format.

Style Dialog

Right-clicking a column head for a field and choosing Style will launch the Style dialog for that field.

 

Styling options for fields of the various data types will appear in the Style dialog based on the data type of the field, with each row in the dialog's list being a style option.  The first column in the Style dialog list is a more-or-less mnemonic letter code, usually a single character or two characters, with the second column in the Style dialog providing a preview of how typical values in the field will appear using that style option.  

 

The mnemonic letters used to identify each style option are the same as the style codes used as arguments for the underlying StringFormat... SQL function used to generate the displayed style from field values.   That provides a handy way to see what the SQL functions do as well as providing a guide for what style codes to use when programmatically duplicating a field style used in a table.

 

 

Click a style option to pick it and then press OK to apply that style option.  Entering a number in the Digits box, choosing an N, E, S, W hemisphere in the Positive degrees box, or choosing a language will automatically update the previews shown in the Style list to incorporate the specified options.

Controls

Standard

A list of prebuilt styles.   The list of styles available will depend on the data type of the field being styled.

Choice

The Choice tab allows entry of list of choice values that are integers, and how those choice values should be displayed.   Editing fields that have a choice style will pop open a drop down list of allowed choices.

 

See the Styling Choices in Tables topic for information on the Choice tab.

(left column)

A more-or-less mnemonic letter code for the style.  For example, c is a mnemonic for currency.  The letters are the same that can be used as arguments to specify that style when working with the StringFormat... SQL function for that field's data type

(right column)

A preview of what the style will display, using example values of the field's data type.   The preview will automatically be updated given any options specified in the Digits box, the Positive degrees box, or picked for a language.

Digits

Enter a number specifying the number of digits after a decimal point, for those formats that have decimal digits.

Positive degrees

Used with numeric fields that represent longitudes and latitudes when positive and negative values are to be displayed using a hemisphere letter for North, East, South, and West.  Pick (none), N, E, S, or W (or the lower case equivalents) to specify which hemisphere letter should be used for positive values.  The opposite hemisphere letter will automatically be used for negative values.   Choose E for longitude values to use the accepted convention that positive longitude values are East longitudes and negative longitude values are West longitudes.    Choose N for latitude values to use the accepted convention that positive latitude values are North latitudes and negative latitude values are South latitudes.

Language

Choose a language-country pair, specifying a language as used in a particular country.  Choosing a language will automatically translate datetime styles that use day of the week and month names into that language's words for days of the week and months.   Numeric and other fields will automatically utilize that country's style for formats, including that country's currency symbol, as well the characters used for list separators, digit group separators in numbers, and decimal point separator.

Language-country picker button.  Launch the Language dialog.

OK

Apply the specified style and exit the dialog.

Cancel

Exit the dialog without making any changes.

Language Dialog

Clicking the language picker button launches the Language dialog.   Choosing a language-country combination chooses that language's names for days of the week names and month names for datetime formats that uses days of the week and months, and it chooses currency and numeric style for that country, such as the character used as a digit group separator in numbers and decimal point character for formats that use decimal positions.

 

The list of language-country combinations will depend on the version of Windows in use.  Windows 10 and 11 provide over 600 choices, while earlier versions of Windows supported by Manifold provide over 300 choices.    All of the commonly used language-country combinations appear both in earlier versions of Windows as well as in Windows 10 and 11, so we are on safe ground choosing one of the usual several dozen choices of languages most often used in international settings.   

 

However, if we choose one of the extended set of languages found in Windows 10 but not in, say, Windows 7, for a particular style, such as a datetime, and we save the project, if we open that project in Windows 7 the field will be formatted as blank content.   Therefore, when using Windows 10 and 11 languages we should plan on sharing projects using those languages only with users who are working with Windows 10 or 11.

 

The Language dialog lists all Windows 10/11 languages.  If we are running some older version Windows, language choices that are not supported by that version of Windows will show the language-country code in the left column but the right column naming the language and country will be blank.  That warns us that the particular Windows version in use will not display that language.

 

 

Click a language to pick it and then press OK to choose it.

Language Dialog Controls

Filter box: Enter text to be matched, case not significant.   The list of language-country codes will be reduced to show only those which match the text.    For example, entering german will reduce the list to codes which include words such as Germany and German in their description.  Entering -US will reduce the list to codes that have -US in their names or descriptions, showing all of the languages associated with the United States.  Entering de- will reduce the list to German language codes as spoken in various countries, as well as the kde-TZ code, for Makonde language as spoken in Tanzania.

(left column)

Windows language-country code.  The language code is an ISO code for a specific language, with the country code being an ISO code for a specific country.  The result is a code that specifies a given language as spoken in a given country.  Examples are de-CH for German language as spoken in Switzerland and de-DE for German language as spoken in Germany.

(right column)

The name of the language with country in parentheses.

OK

Choose the picked language and close the dialog.

Cancel

Close the dialog without making any changes.

 

Numeric Example

We can change the display style of a numeric field to show currency.

 

 

For example, we can right-click on the Unit Price column header and choose Style.

 

 

The Style dialog shows previews of what different styles will look like using the data type of the field.  Numbers can be used to represent many different things, such as latitudes and longitudes, scientific values, currency, and more, so there are many different styles in the list.

 

We can then choose a currency style.  

 

 

The Style dialog launched from the context menu allows us to choose a Language, which is (neutral) by default.   Choosing the neutral default or a US language like en-US results in use of a dollar sign at the beginning of the value and US style numbers, using a dot . character for the decimal separator.

Choosing a Language

We can change the language and country settings by right-clicking the Unit Price column header again, and choosing Style.

 

 

 Pick a language by clicking the language picker button, and then choosing More.  

 

 

The Language dialog shows over 600 language-country codes.    That can make it difficult to find a particular language and country combination, so in most cases we will use the filter box to narrow down the choices to something manageable.

 

 

For example, entering Germany in the filter box will reduce the list to only those entries that have Germany in them.   That picks out all of the language options used in Germany.   We can click the de-DE choice to choose German language as used in Germany.

 

Press OK to apply the choice.

 

 

The Style dialog will now show options as used in German language in Germany.   

 

Press OK to apply to the table.

 

 

Choosing a different language, such as by entering de-DE for German, in the Language box in the Style dialog will cause the currency style to use settings for that language and country, for example, using a euro sign at the end of the value and German style numbers, using a comma , character for the decimal separator.

 

 

Styles are available for most data types, such as datetime values.

 

 

For example, we can choose a style that shows the day of the week and the name of months.  Using (neutral) or en-US in the Language box of the Style dialog will result in US style English words.

 

 

Using a different language, such as de-DE for German, in the Language box of the Style dialog will result in automatically translated names for the days of the week and months.

Editing / Filtering Styled Fields

There are two cases when styles are not applied in table windows, even if we have used the Style context menu command to set the style for a given field:

 

 

 

Favorite Languages and Field Styles

When choosing a style for fields, we have a Language option that allows us to pick from over 600 language-country combinations.  We can save time when picking frequently used languages by making them favorites.

 

Right-clicking on a column header and choosing Style calls up the Style dialog.   

 

 

 We can make a favorite of a language-country option that we have picked in the Language option, such as de-DE for German language in Germany, by clicking the language picker button and choosing Favorites.

 

 

 

Ctrl-click the language choice in the lower pane to select it.

 

 

Press the Add to Favorites button to add it to the Favorites list in the upper pane.

 

 

Press OK to update the Favorites list.

 

 

Now, whenever we click the language picker button, we will see our choice in the Favorites list, enabling us to assign it with a single click.

Language Codes

Language codes that are used in the Style dialog, are standard language codes as used in many settings in Windows, such as de-DE for German language as used in Germany, or en-US for English as used in the US.  A table giving 655 language codes, including broad variations as haw-US for Hawaiian language as used in the United States, can be downloaded in the language_codes.map Release 9 project from the Manifold website.

Reference Guide to Field Styles

Display options shown in the Style command depend on the data type of the field:

 

 

In addition to styles for the above data types, the Style command also provides a Choice option to display values from a set of choices to match an integer token found in a numeric field.

Binary Styles

Binary styles are simple, with the choice of reporting the field content as varbinary data, as in <varbinary>,  or as reporting the field content as varbinary data with the number of bytes <varbinary,149 b>, the default.   

 

Language choices will affect the separator character used in the style and in the number of bytes.   For example,  a comma , character is used as a separator for neutral and US English, and a dot . character used as a separator when a European language is specified.  The separator character between displayed parts of the style will also switch to match the language, for example, switching to a semicolon ; character for German in Germany.   For example, <varbinary, 4,836 b> for English in the US as compared to  <varbinary; 4.836 b> for German in Germany.

 

The number of bytes reported is the number of bytes in the value as it is stored in a .map file, with some compression already applied.

 

b

Data type name: <varbinary>

B

Data type name with number of bytes (default): <varbinary, XXX b>

 

Using the B option with neutral choice of Language:

 

 

Using the B option with de-DE (German as used in Germany) choice of Language:

 

 

Boolean Styles

Provides a choice of displaying TRUE and FALSE Boolean values as the numbers 1 and 0 or as the words true and false, or TRUE and FALSE.

 

b

Display TRUE as 1 and FALSE as 0.

t

Display TRUE as true and FALSE as false.  The default.

T

Display TRUE as TRUE and FALSE as FALSE.

 

Using the T option:

 

 

When entering new records or editing Boolean fields in existing records, Boolean fields always show a pop-up menu choice of true or false, with no need to explicitly specify choices as described in the Styling Choices in Tables topic, since there are always only two possible choices for Boolean fields.

 

Datetime Styles

The Style dialog provides an extensive selection of different date and time styles, which will automatically adapt to language-country choices specified in the Language setting.  Over 600 languages are supported by Manifold in Windows 10, with automatic use of correct language names for days of the week and months and automatic use of the correct cultural format for the country.

 

 

 

(default)

Short date + long time (default):   3/15/2021 19:30:00

d

Short date: 3/15/2021

D

Long date: Wednesday, March 15, 2021

f

Long date + short time:  Monday, March 15, 2021 19:30

F

Long date + long time:   Monday, March 15, 2021 19:30:00

g

Short date + short time:   3/15/2021 19:30

G

Short date + long time (default):   3/15/2021 19:30:00

m

Short month and day:   15 Mar

M

Long month and day:   15 March

r

RFC1123 (language ignored, always neutral):  Mon, 15 Mar 2021 19:30:00 GMT

s

Sortable (language ignored, always neutral):    2021-03-15T19:30:00

t

Short time:   19:30

T

Long time:   19:30:00

u

Universal sortable  (language ignored, always neutral):   2021-03-15 19:30:00Z

y

Year and month:   March 2021

 

Example

The table has two datetime fields, with the Datetime Copy field having copies of values in the Datetime field to allow quick comparison of display options.   Using the default option for the Datetime field and the D option with neutral choice of Language for the Datetime Copy field:

 

 

Using the f option (long date + short time) option for both fields, but using Arabic language as used in Qatar (ar-QA) for the Datetime field and German as used in Germany (de-DE) for the Datetime Copy field:

 

 

Some language formats do not use days of the week, or may use very different order than used in the neutral or English language settings.   The setting for Arabic in Qatar, for example, uses 12 hour clock time, with the local language equivalent of AM or PM used.

Datetime Custom Styles

The Custom tab in the Style dialog for datetime fields allows us to construct a custom pattern to specify the display style of datetime values.

 

 

Enter a style pattern in the Pattern box.   A preview of what the style pattern generates appears just below the Pattern box.   

 

A pattern can be any combination of patterns listed in the Custom tab list, together with any other characters desired.    

 

 

d

Day:   15

dd

Day:   15

ddd

Short week day:   Mon

dddd

Long week day:   Monday

g

Era:   A.D.

gg

Era:   A.D.

h

Hour on a 12-hour scale:   7

hh

Hour on a 12-hour scale, leading zero:   07

H

Hour on a 24-hour scale:   19

HH

Hour on a 24-hour scale:   19

m

Minute:   30

mm

Minute, leading zero:   30

M

Month as a number:    3

MM

Month as a number, leading zero:   03

MMM

Short month:   Mar

MMMM

Long month:   March

s

Second:   0

ss

Second, leading zero:    00

t

Short time marker:   P

tt

Long time marker:   PM

y

Short year:  21

yy

Short year, leading zero:  21

yyy

Long year:   2021

yyyy

Long year:   2021

yyyyy

Long year:   2021

 

Long year patterns accept up to five letters because some language/country combinations allow up to five digits in the year.

Building a Pattern

We can enter parts of a pattern by either keyboarding them in the Pattern box or by double-clicking a pattern in the Custom list to add it to the pattern.

 

If only a single character appears in the Pattern box that matches one of the styles in the Standard tab, that will generate that style from the Standard tab.  For example, the default example pattern of d matches the short date option, so the preview shows a short date style of 03/15/2021.   That allows us to quickly use a single-character style from the Standard list.

 

If more than one character appears in the Pattern box, then the resulting pattern is parsed based on the patterns listed in the Custom tab, together with any other characters that might be in the pattern.  Any character or any character sequence different from the above patterns, for example, / or :, is copied without any changes.

 

 

For example, the pattern d-MMM-yy h:mm results in the preview 15-Mar-21 7:30.   

 

 

Changing the pattern to d-MMM-yy H:mm results in the preview 15-Mar-21 19:30.   , since replacing the h pattern for hour on a 12-hour scale with H for hour on a 24-hour scale results in the 7 in the hour part of the time to be replaced with 19.

 

 

Changing the language to de-DE for German as spoken in Germany translates the various pattern results into German language, using Mrz as an abbreviation for März (March in German).

Example

The example table below has two datetime fields, with the Datetime Copy field having copies of values in the Datetime field to allow quick comparison of display options.   Using the default option for the Datetime with neutral choice of Language for both fields, and then specifying a Custom pattern for the Datetime Copy field:

 

Using a Pattern of d-MMM-yy h:mm tt

 

 

Results:

 

 

 

Using a Pattern of dddd, d MMMM, yyyy g

 

 

Results:

 

 

Using a Pattern of hh:mm:ss (dd.mm.yyyy)

 

 

Results:

 

 

Note that in all of the above, the datetime values are exactly the same.   The only thing that has changed is how they are displayed in tables, the info pane, and in labels.

Geom Styles

Geometry styles provide a basic display of the data type (geom, geomwkb, or geommfd), the data type with the number of bytes in the object, the object type, or the object type with the number of coordinates and branches.   Objects with Z values in the geometry will be reported with a z appended to the object type: areazlinez, or pointz.

 

Language choices will affect the separator character used in the style and in the number of bytes.   For example,  a comma , character is used as a separator for neutral and US English, and a dot . character used as a separator when a European language is specified.  The separator character between displayed parts of the style will also switch to match the language, for example, switching to a semicolon ; character for German in Germany.   For example, <geom, 4,836 b> for English in the US as compared to  <geom; 4.836 b> for German in Germany.

 

The number of bytes reported is the number of bytes in the value expanded into RAM, with no compression.

 

b

Data type name: <geom> or <geomwkb> or <geommfd>

B

Data type name with number of bytes: <geom, XXX b>

t

Type of geometry (default):  <geom, line>

T

Type of geometry, the number of coordinates and for more branches than 1, the number of branches after a slash: <geom, line, 200 c / 3>

 

Using the t option for the Geom field, the T option for the GeomWKB field, and the B option for the GeomMFD field, with neutral choice of Language for all three fields:

 

 

Using the t option for the Geom field, the T option for the GeomWKB field, and the B option for the GeomMFD field, with de-DE (German as used in Germany) choice of Language for all three fields:

 

Numeric Styles

The Style dialog provides many options to display numbers, since numbers can be used to represent values such as longitudes and latitudes, which have their own variety of display formats, in addition to various ways of representing numbers.  

 

Currency formatting takes the digit group separator, decimal point character, and monetary symbol from the language argument.   Negative values are shown within parentheses ( ) characters.

 

The Digits option specifies an optional number of decimal digits after the decimal point for the smallest unit in the format used.  

 

The Positive degrees option is used when styling longitude and latitude values, with a choice such as N, E, S, and W specifying which hemisphere has positive angular values, with the opposite hemisphere using negative numbers.  When styling latitude numbers, choose N to apply the convention that positive numbers are North latitudes and negative numbers are South latitudes.  When styling longitude numbers, choose E to apply the convention that positive numbers are East longitudes and negative numbers are West longitudes.

 

Using a longitude value of 10.687 for the angle styles, and an example value of 123456.7890123 for other styles with an example language of en-US, the available styles are:

 

(default)

Fractional with all decimal digits by default: 123456.7890123

ad

Angle in decimal degrees: 10.69º

am

Angle in degrees and decimal minutes: 10º41.22'

as

Angle in degrees, minutes and decimal seconds: 10º41'13.20"

c

Currency, using the language setting:   $123,456.79

d

Decimal integer: 123457

e

Exponential with lower case e, using the language setting for decimal point: 1.234568e+05

E

Exponential with upper case E, using the language setting for decimal point: 1.234568E+05

f

Fractional, with two decimal digits if Digits not specified: 123456.79

n

fractional using digit groups, with two decimal digits if Digits not specified: 123,456.79

x

hexadecimal integer using lower case letters: 1e241

X

hexadecimal integer using upper case letters: 1E241

 

 

Default settings in a table showing a variety of fields.  The Longitude and Latitude fields are float64 numbers:

 

 

The ad, am, and as options for numeric fields are formats specially designed for numbers that represent angular measurements, like latitudes and longitudes.  

 

For example, right-clicking on the Longitude column head and choosing Style, we can choose the ad option, using a Digits number of 3 for three digits after the decimal point.  

 

 

Longitudes and latitudes almost always in GIS are shown as positive and negative numbers, following the convention that positive longitude numbers are East longitudes, that is, to the East of the Prime Meridian, and negative longitude numbers are West longitudes, that is, to the West of the Prime Meridian.    Likewise, positive latitude numbers are North latitudes, to the North of the Equator and negative latitude numbers are South latitudes, to the South of the Equator.

 

Another common way of representing East or West longitudes and North or South latitudes is, instead of using positive or negative numbers, to append a letter like N, E, S, or W to indicate East and West longitudes or North or South latitudes.   The Positive degrees option in the Style dialog allows us to specify which hemisphere uses positive numbers.   In the example above, where we are specifying the display style for numbers in the Longitude column, we have chosen E in the Positive degrees box.  That tells the system to append an E to positive numbers to indicate they are East longitudes, and to append a W to negative numbers to indicate they are West longitudes:

 

 

The table instantly shows positive numbers in the Longitude column with three digits after the decimal point, followed by a degree symbol and a capital E character.   Negative numbers in the Longitude column are shown with a capital W character.

 

We can right-click onto the Latitude column head and choose Style to specify an analogous style for the latitude numbers:

 

 

We choose ad as the style option, 3 as the number of Digits, and N for the Positive degrees hemisphere, meaning, to append an N character for positive latitude values and appending an S character for negative latitude values:

 

 

Note that specifying display styles that use letters and symbols like the degree symbol does not change the numeric data type of the Longitude and Latitude fields into a text data type. Likewise, choosing the number of Digits to display past the decimal point does not round the numbers to only three digits after the decimal point.   All we change is how the numbers are displayed in the table, but not the numbers themselves or their data type.

 

The other options in the Style dialog, besides the ad, am, and as options intended for latitude and longitude fields, are styles that can be used with numeric values.   Examples of their use follow below:

 

Using neutral language for all fields.  Using c currency setting for the Float64 Field, E exponential setting for Integer Field, and am degrees with decimal minutes setting for the Longitude and Latitude fields:

 

 

Using German language as used in Germany (de-DE) language for all fields.  Using c currency setting for the Float64 Field, E exponential setting for Integer Field, and as degrees, minutes and decimal seconds setting for the Longitude and Latitude fields, with E being the Positive degrees setting for Longitude and N being the Positive degrees setting for Latitude:

 

 

Note how the use of German language as used in Germany (de-DE) not only switched the digit group separator from a comma , character to a dot . character in the Float64 Field, it also changed the decimal point character from a dot . character to a comma , character in all fields, and it switched the currency symbol from a dollar sign to a euro sign, moving the currency symbol to the end of the displayed value.

Numeric Vector Styles

Numeric vector values are formatted using the same styles as numeric values, with a variation for ad, am, and as angle styles that are intended to support the frequent use of numeric vectors to represent longitude and latitude values in a two component vector, or to represent longitude, latitude, and Z values in a three component vector.  

 

When using ad, am, and as angle styles together with a Positive degrees hemisphere designation, the hemisphere letter will alternate between the two vector components, between N and E or between S and W as follows:

 

 

 

(default)

Fractional with all decimal digits by default: 123456.7890123

ad

Angle in decimal degrees: 10.69º

 

Specifying a positive hemisphere will alternate N/E and S/W tags in the first two vector components.

am

Angle in degrees and decimal minutes: 10º41.22'

 

Specifying a positive hemisphere will alternate N/E and S/W tags in the first two vector components.

as

Angle in degrees, minutes and decimal seconds: 10º41'13.20"

 

Specifying a positive hemisphere will alternate N/E and S/W tags in the first two vector components.

c

Currency, using the language setting:   $123,456.79

d

Decimal integer: 123457

e

Exponential with lower case e, using the language setting for decimal point: 1.234568e+05

E

Exponential with upper case E, using the language setting for decimal point: 1.234568E+05

f

Fractional, with two decimal digits if Digits not specified: 123456.79

n

fractional using digit groups, with two decimal digits if Digits not specified: 123,456.79

x

hexadecimal integer using lower case letters: 1e241

X

hexadecimal integer using upper case letters: 1E241

 

When specifying a Positive degrees option, the use of alternating N/E or S/W characters can be easily seen in previews in the Style dialog:

 

 

Consider the table above, which has a two component numeric vector field called x2 float vector.   If we right-click on the column head for that field and choose Style we launch the style dialog for that field:

 

 

With no option chosen in the Positive degrees box, both components of the vector will be formatted using angle styles with no use of N, E, S, or W designations.

 

 

If we choose E for the Positive degrees hemisphere option, the preview in the Style dialog shows angle styles like ad will use E to indicate positive numbers for the first component and N to indicate positive numbers in the second component.   That is the usual arrangement when the first value in the vector represents a longitude and the second value represents a latitude.

 

 

If we are dealing with backwards, YX coordinate ordering in the vector, so that the first value represents latitudes and the second value represents longitudes, we can choose N for the Positive degrees hemisphere option.    In that case the preview in the Style dialog shows angle styles like ad will use N to indicate positive numbers for the first component and E to indicate positive numbers in the second component.  

 

Choosing W or S in the Positive degrees box covers the other two combinations of conventional XY ordering and backwards positive hemisphere choice, or double backwards use of backwards YX ordering with  backwards positive hemisphere choice.   Those are very unusual situations but, as they say, "there is one in every crowd," so Manifold provides means to deal with such situations.

 

Choosing the ad option with the conventional E choice for Positive degrees results in a useful display for conventional ordering of longitude and latitude values within a numeric vector:

 

 

Choosing a style to format a three component vector, like the x3 uint vector field in the table above, is just like formatting a two component vector except that the third value is always displayed as a floating point number when a hemisphere choice is made in the Positive degrees box.  

 

For example, if we right-click  the x3 uint vector field and choose Style we get a default preview of options in the Style dialog:

 

 

All three components of the numeric vector will be formatted the same way in each of the styles.

 

 

However, if we make a choice in the Positive degrees box, such as E, the ad, am, and as angle styles will format the first two values using E and N letters respectively to indicate positive values, while displaying the third value as a floating point number.

 

We press OK to apply that style, to see how it looks in the table:

 

 

The result is a typical display for a three component vector where the first two values are longitude and latitude values, with the third value being some numeric value associated with that location, such as a Z value for heights, or a temperature or some other number.

Text Styles

Styles for text fields, either nvarchar or varchar text types,  provide two options: either simple text or formatting as a URL.    If a text field is styled as a URL, valid URL values are shown as hyperlinks, both in a table window and in the Info pane.

 

 

(default)

Simple text:  quick brown fox

u

Format valid URL strings as hyperlinks: https://manifold.net/

 

 

Consider the table shown above, which has an nvarchar text field called URL_Overview, which provides a URL to a page that shows an overview diagram for the total eclipse of that date.

 

 

Right-clicking on the URL_Overview column head and choosing Style, and then choosing the URL option will style the fields as hyperlinks, using whatever is the current Windows color for hyperlinks (blue by default).  

 

 

We can right-click on any of the URL_Oveview cells and choose Open URL to launch the hyperlink in a browser window.   For example, right-clicking on the third cell and choosing Open URL will launch the hyperlink:

 

https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEplot/SEplot2001/SE2024Apr08T.GIF

 

which will display an overview diagram of the total eclipse of the sun for 8 April 2024.  Given typical weather patterns for early April, the best viewing with good international travel connections is likely to be in Texas near the border with Mexico.

 

 

The hyperlink style will only be applied to cells where the entire text value is a valid URL.   For example, in the illustration above we have altered the text in one of the cells to include the additional text My link: in front of the URL text.  Since the text My link:  https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEplot/SEplot2001/SE2027Aug02T.GIF is not a valid URL, the entire contents of the cell are shown in plain text style, not in hyperlink style.  

 

 

If we edit the cell to delete the extra My link: text, the cell will automatically be formatted as a hyperlink.

 

URLs can also use the file: URL scheme to refer to files:

 

 

Right-clicking on one of the cells in URL field in the table above and choosing Open URL will launch that URL in our default browser.   

 

The table shows example files that are .jpg format images, but launching a file: URL will launch any file type in a browser that the browser understands.  For example, modern versions of Microsoft's Edge browser will open PDF files, Excel spreadsheets, and other Office documents.  That allows us to keep links to files in our Manifold projects, and to then open those files for viewing.

 

Tile Styles

Tile styles provide formatting to report the number of bytes in a tile, the size of the tile and number of channels, or the size of the tile and the number of channels and data type used in channels.   When the number of bytes in a tile is reported, that is the size in bytes of the tile expanded into RAM, with no compression.

 

b

Data type name: <tile>

B

Data type name with number of bytes (default): <tile, XXX b>

t

The width x height size of the tile, with the number of channels when there is more than one channel (default):  <tile, 128 x 128 x 3>

T

The width x height size of the tile, with the data type and number of channels when there is more than one channel:  <tile, 128 x 128, float64x3>  

 

A typical default display for an RGB image is seen below:

 

 

Right-clicking on the column header for the Tile field and choosing Style, we can pick the T option to show the data type used within channels.  

 

 

The above illustration is for neutral language.

 

 

We can launch the Style dialog again and choose German language as used in Germany (de-DE) to alter the displayed style, switching semicolon ; characters for the comma , characters used in US style grouping.

UUID Styles

The only two options for UUID fields is to use lower case (the default) or upper case for letters that are part of the hexadecimal UUID.

 

 

x

Lower case letters: a0341f38-2cbe-4098-9669-4aa88e659f9e

X

Upper case letters: A0341F38-2CBE-4098-9669-4AA88E659F9E

 

The default, using lower case letters:

 

 

Using the X style for upper case letters:

 

 

There is no language option for UUID fields, since the styles are the same for all languages and countries.

 

Notes

How to copy a formatted value?  Suppose we have styled a datetime field so that values like  05/19/2016 07:27:37 will display as Thursday, 19 May 2016.   If we right-click onto that cell and choose Copy, what is pasted into some other setting will be 05/19/2016 07:27:37 and not Thursday, 19 May 2016.   That is because we copy the true value that is in the cell, which is a datetime value and not a text string that includes words for the day of the week and the name of the month.    If we want to copy the styled version of the date, we should create a new text field and then fill it with formatted, string versions of the datetime values, using an expression in the Transform pane such as:

 

StringFormatDateTime([Datetime], 'D', '')

 

That will create text values in the cells for that field, so when we copy the contents of the cell we copy a text string for what is seen in the cell, and not a datetime value.

See Also

Tables

 

Editing Tables

 

Data Types

 

Styling Choices in Tables

 

Info Pane

 

Drawings

 

Labels

 

Maps